Single gender classrooms

 Description he Analyzer: This model is the most thorough and careful of all. It takes time to build and the arguer meticulously goes over each supporting point, the opposition to it, and then the refutation to it. This is a good model to choose when there are overlapping points to discuss for each side. I. Colorful Introduction a. establish the problem/situation/issue b. make the audience care about why this important c. clearly state your thesis/claim II. Background/definition a. include any historical information necessary b. further develop the topic, issue c. provide any necessary definitions III. Point 1 Provide reason/evidence that supports your claim COUNTERARGUMENT:. Provide reason/evidence that supports the counterargument ReButtal: Provide reason/evidence that supports the refutation IV. Point 2 Provide reason/evidence that supports your claim COUNTERARGUMENT:. Provide reason/evidence that supports the counterargument ReButtal: Provide reason/evidence that supports the refutation V. Point 3 Provide reason/evidence that supports your claim COUNTERARGUMENT:. Provide reason/evidence that supports the counterargument ReButtal: Provide reason/evidence that supports the refutation (Obviously you can have more than three reasons/claims that relate back to your overall thesis) VI. Conclude a. Conclusions in arguments typically will directly address the arguer’s “proposal.” Meaning, the arguer either encourages the audience to DO SOMETHING. This can include: learn more about an issue, take a stand, enter a fight, change their mind, make a donation, change a behavior, etc  This model is the most thorough and careful of all. It takes time to build and the arguer meticulously goes over each supporting point, the opposition to it, and then the refutation to it. This is a good model to choose when there are overlapping points to discuss for each side. I. Colorful Introduction a. establish the problem/situation/issue b. make the audience care about why this important c. clearly state your thesis/claim II. Background/definition a. include any historical information necessary b. further develop the topic, issue c. provide any necessary definitions III. Point 1 Provide reason/evidence that supports your claim COUNTERARGUMENT:. Provide reason/evidence that supports the counterargument ReButtal: Provide reason/evidence that supports the refutation IV. Point 2 Provide reason/evidence that supports your claim COUNTERARGUMENT:. Provide reason/evidence that supports the counterargument ReButtal: Provide reason/evidence that supports the refutation V. Point 3 Provide reason/evidence that supports your claim COUNTERARGUMENT:. Provide reason/evidence that supports the counterargument ReButtal: Provide reason/evidence that supports the refutation (Obviously you can have more than three reasons/claims that relate back to your overall thesis) VI. Conclude a. Conclusions in arguments typically will directly address the arguer’s “proposal.” Meaning, the arguer either encourages the audience to DO SOMETHING. This can include: learn more about an issue, take a stand, enter a fight, change their mind, make a donation, change a behavior, etc

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