exercise 1.12 ‘Inflectional Morphology: Latin Declensions’ page 3. Analyze the data on your own…

exercise 1.12 ‘Inflectional Morphology: Latin Declensions’ page 3. Analyze the data on your own the same way that you have done before. Then, write a brief article in which you compare and contrast English and Latin from two angles: 1. In terms of its case marking: Argue that Latin expresses Case, where English does not and illustrate this with relevant sentences to convince the reader, and 2. Compare and contrast the word order of Latin and English. (Here as well, provide data to support your observations and present the data in such a way that someone who does not know Latin understands what the data reveal.) You need not discuss every sentence that is presented in the exercise; judge for yourself how many examples you need to discuss in order to convince the reader of your observations. Pay close attention to what you have learned about representing linguistic data. You must present the data using proper glosses!
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Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17 U.S. Code) Pursuant to the federal copyright act (Title 17 of the United States Code), it is presumptively unlawful to reproduce, distribute, or publicly display any copyrighted work (or any substantial portion thereof), without the permission of the copyright owner. The statute, however, recognizes a fair use defense that has the effect of excusing an act of copyright infringement. It is the intention of the library to act within the parameters of the fair use defense in allowing limited posting of copyrighted materials in Electronic Course Reserve areas such as this one. It is the intention of the library, moreover, that such materials be made available solely for the purposes of private study, scholarship, and research, and that any further reproduction of such materials by students, by printing or downloading, be limited to such purposes. Any further reproduction of copyrighted materials made from this computer system may be in violation of copyright laws and is prohibited.CHAPTER ONE MORPHOLOGY 3 From: Frommer, Paul R. and Edward Finegan. 2012. Looking at Languages; A Workbook in Elementary Linguistics. Wadsworth. 1.00 SOLVED PROBLEM MORPHEMES: Hungarian Morpheme Identification Below you will find a number of simple sentences in Hungarian. The sentences have been trans­ lated, but individual words and morphemes have not been identified. Examine the data carefully, comparing the different sentences and their translations. Without looking at the discussion and solutions that have been provided, answer the questions for yourself. Then check your answers. (Data adapted from Hudoba n.d.) The data are given in standard Hungarian spelling. In Hungarian: gy represents a sound similar to the dy combination in did you s is pronounced like the sh in show a is pronounced somewhat like the o in above 1. Mi magasak vagyunk. ‘We are tall.’ 2. En beteg vagyok. ‘I am…