consider the following statement: “A happy worker is a productive worker.” Drawing on the subject…

Assignment 1 – Critical Analysis Essay (20%) MGMT90018 Managerial Psychology – 2019 Semester 1 Due Monday, 29 April 2019 at 8:00am (08:00) Melbourne time. This is an individual assignment in which you must submit a critical analysis essay of up to 1000 words (excluding headings, in-text citations, and the reference list). The Topic: For this assignment, you must consider the following statement: “A happy worker is a productive worker.” Drawing on the subject seminars, readings, activities, and your own research, provide a thoughtful critical analysis essay around this statement and the topics of happiness and productivity. Suggestions: Some points you may wish to (but don’t have to) address include: • What does it mean to be “happy”? • What does it mean to be “productive”? • What does the evidence say about happiness and productivity? • Do you agree with the statement? Why or why not? • Are happiness and productivity important? Why or why not? • Are there ethical dimensions to this? If so, discuss. You do not necessarily have to follow this line of questioning if you have your own approach; you may focus on only some of the questions above and/or think of your own. The most important aspect of this assignment is simply that you provide a critical analysis of and reflection on the statement, “A happy worker is a productive worker”. This is a broad topic, so there are many directions you could take your assignment and therefore many “correct answers”. Expectations: You are expected to draw on the following in your assignment: • Concepts and evidence discussed in the seminars and assigned readings for Weeks 1 to 7. • Applicable results and observations from tasks undertaken in class (e.g., personality tests, perceptions, motivation exercises, etc.). • Your own additional research using academic journal articles. As a guideline and given the length requirement, you should aim to include a balance of three to five main topics from the content in Weeks 1 to 7. Link it to academic research (you might use Google Scholar and/or library resources – link provided in the subject guide), as well as to relevant personal examples, including your personal life experience and/or class discussions and activities. You are not expected to cover every single topic/theory covered in Weeks 1 to 7. You should choose which theories are relevant to your essay and the examples that you are using. Of 2 course, you need to briefly communicate WHAT (descriptive analysis) your argument/point of view is (drawing on personal experience), but your primary focus needs to be on WHY you take a certain position (supported largely by academic journal articles). Put simply, we want you to focus more on the WHY and less on the WHAT. Do not leave it up to your marker to make the connections for you. Explain and support your logic. Format and Style: Several notes on style: • As mentioned in the Subject Guide, you should follow the American Psychological Association (APA) style for citation and referencing (link also available in the Subject Guide). • It is appropriate to write in the first person (i.e., from your point of view, using pronouns ‘I’, ‘me’, ‘my’, ‘we’, etc.). • An essay includes an introduction, body, and conclusion. Take a look at the student resources linked in the Subject Guide if you need to further develop your writing skills. • It may be useful to use headings and subheadings to break up and organise your essay. • You do not need a cover sheet, but on the first page, be sure to include the subject code and name, your stream (class day/time), your name (no nicknames, please), and your student number. Submission Method The project must be submitted using LMS (specifically, TurnItIn), via the “Assignment 1: Critical Analysis Essay” link under “Assignment Submission”. You will upload a file (typically a Microsoft doc or docx file). Make sure that you go through all of the screens and that you finalise your submission. (It would be wise to take a screen capture or photo of the final submission screen for your own records.) Similarity Checks and Plagiarism: You will see that you may check your own similarity scores (for potential plagiarism) before actually submitting the assignment to us. However, TurnItIn may restrict the frequency at which you can check this if you attempt to conduct multiple checks in a short amount of time. Note that a high similarity score does not necessarily indicate plagiarism, and a low similarity score does not necessarily mean that no plagiarism exists. Please be familiar with the plagiarism and academic integrity links in the Subject Guide, as well as the plagiarism discussion from Week 1. And importantly, let us know if you have any questions.