Business Report

 Description complete the following assignment: A Few Thoughts on Business Report Format Operations and Supply Chain Management Introduction This document is intended to provide the student reader with some relevant thoughts on preferred format for business reports. There is plenty of opportunity for students to apply creativity in how they structure their papers. As such, this document is not necessarily intended as a template to be followed exactly on deliverables. It is suggested that students also drawn on external examples of professional business reports for inspiration, including documents such as annual reports to shareholders. Executive Summary When called upon to do so, it is frequently useful to provide an executive summary of your full white paper. By definition, a white paper is typically used to establish a position on a developing issue under consideration. As such, it can frequently become relatively extensive, detailed, and laden with research sources. Business executive do not always have the time or inclination to commit themselves to fully digesting such papers, at least not until they are convinced of the value and/or necessity of doing so. Therefore, a 1-3 page Executive Summary becomes invaluable in condensing the main points of the broader White Paper. A target ratio of 10% in page length is usually appropriate, with an average of 2 pages frequently being sufficient. Students should use an executive summary deliverable as a chance to confirm topic, sources, and format with the Instructor. Body of Document Business reports are arguably most frequently single-spaced, with an anecdotal observation of preference for Arial or Calibri fonts in 10-12 point size. Again, the student should feel empowered to establish their own professional communication style, within reason. Normal graphic design rules of limiting the variety of styles on a single page are probably wise. In other words, single style of font, bold/italics only when needed, secondary size limited to larger title and/or smaller footnotes. Look of the document should not distract from message… Conclusion Quality business writing is clear and concise. Length of the document, in and of itself, is not the goal or of value. Whether developing an elevator pitch for business development or learning to engage your reader early in a document, students will benefit from practicing direct, abbreviated communications. That said, if it adds value to the topic, include it. Graphs, charts, diagrams, flowcharts, and photos can all be very helpful. Tell your reader what you will tell them (Introduction), tell them (Body), and then tell them what you told them (Conclusion).

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